Tag: Linux

  • Title Linux From Scratch
  • Author(s) Gerard Beekmans
  • Publisher: lulu.com (June 17, 2012); eBook (2012 – Date)
  • Paperback 346 pages (The Base Book Only)
  • eBook HTML and PDF Files
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1300019832
  • ISBN-13: 978-1300019831








Book Description

This Linux From Scratch book is the central core around that project. It provides the background and instructions necessary for you to design and build your own system. While this book provides a template that will result in a correctly working system, you are free to alter the instructions to suit yourself, which is, in part, an important part of this project. You remain in control; we just lend a helping hand to get you started on your own journey.

There are many reasons why you would want to read this book. One of the questions many people raise is, “why go through all the hassle of manually building a Linux system from scratch when you can just download and install an existing one?” Linux From Scratch – Version 7.6 ix

One important reason for this project’s existence is to help you learn how a Linux system works from the inside out. Building an LFS system helps demonstrate what makes Linux tick, and how things work together and depend on each other. One of the best things that this learning experience can provide is the ability to customize a Linux system to suit your own unique needs. Another key benefit of LFS is that it allows you to have more control over the system without relying on someone else’s Linux implementation.

LFS allows you to create very compact Linux systems. When installing regular distributions, you are often forced to install a great many programs which are probably never used or understood. These programs waste resources. You may argue that with today’s hard drive and CPUs, such resources are no longer a consideration. Sometimes, however, you are still constrained by size considerations if nothing else. Think about bootable CDs, USB sticks, and embedded systems.

The goal of Linux From Scratch is to build a complete and usable foundation-level system. If you do not wish to build your own Linux system from scratch, you may not entirely benefit from the information in this book. There are too many other good reasons to build your own LFS system to list them all here. In the end, education is by far the most powerful of reasons. As you continue in your LFS experience, you will discover the power that information and knowledge truly bring

About Authors

Gerard Beekmans is the initiator and organizer of the Linux From Scratch (LFS) project.Gerard Beekmans started Linux From Scratch, his guide to building a Linux Operating System from the bottom up, for two reasons. First, because he didn’t like the way existing distributions dictated organization and ultimately had more control over his operating system than he did. Second, because he had just moved from Holland to Toronto,
Canada, to marry the woman he fell in love with online.

He says moving to Canada was the best thing he’s done in a while. And the look on his face in pictures from his wedding confirm the pleasure I could hear in his voice. He is long and lean and will look different at thirty then he does at twenty-one but he won’t alter much after that. Once he fully matures he will be one of those men who get increasingly svelte as they age.

My journey to learn and better understand Linux began over a decade ago, back in 1998. I had just installed my first Linux distribution and had quickly become intrigued with the whole concept and philosophy behind Linux. There are always many ways to accomplish a single task. The same can be said about Linux distributions. A great many have existed over the years. Some still exist, some have morphed into something else, yet others have been relegated to our memories. They all do things differently to suit the needs of their target audience. Because so many different ways to accomplish the same end goal exist, I began to realize I no longer had to be limited by any one implementation.

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  • Title C Programming in Linux
  • Author(s) David Haskins
  • Publisher: bookboon.com (2009)
  • Paperback N/A
  • eBook Online, PDF, 84 pages
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: N/A
  • ISBN-13: 978-87-7681-472-4








Book Description

This short book contains a number of “tricks” that the author have learned over the years for which there is little explicit documentation, and it frankly presupposes a familiarity with Linux.

C is built right into the core of Linux and Unix. The design idea behind Unix was to wrtie and operating system in C so all you needed to port it to a new architecture was a C compiler. Linux is essentially the success story of a series of earlier attempts to make a PC version of Unix

C is like heaving a very sharp knife which can be dangerous, but if you were learning to be a chef you would need one and probably cut yourself discovering what it can do. Similarly C expects you to know what you are doing, and if you don’t it will not warn before it crashes. A knowledge of C is now and has been for years a pre-requisite for serious software professionals and with the recent popularity and maturity if Open Systems this is even more true.

During this book will be treated in details simple data types in C language. The data types are integers, booleans, chars, strings etc. Some other issues treated in this book are: the concept of memory management, functions, poinetrs, structures, logic, loops, control flow.

After the basic concepts are explained the next step is database handling with MySQL. Two topics are covered in this chapter which are: on not reinventing the wheel and MySQL C API

In chapter 6 are covered the graphics and interfaces in C. The graphics management will be explained using GD library. The first topic covered is generating binary content, then using TrueType Fonts and GD function reference.

About Authors

David Haskins was born in 1950 in Chelsea, London. He have worked in the computer industry after a couple of years as professional drummer.

His first experience was five years as a mainframe hardware engineer for Sperry Univac followed by 14 years as an analyst programmer with British Telecom in London

Since 1994 he has been a senior lecturer at the Faculty of Computing, Information Systems and Mathematics at Kingston University, London.

He is engaged mainly in teaching many computer languages and internet systems design to a large and multicultural student body.

Most of his academic research and commercial consultancy has been involved with spatial systems design and the large data volumes and necessary processing efficiency has led him to concentrate on C and C++

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  • Title Advanced Linux Programming
  • Author(s)Mark L. Mitchell, Alex Samuel, Jeffrey Oldham
  • Publisher: Sams Publishing; 1 edition (June 21, 2001)
  • Paperback 340 pages
  • eBook Online, PDF files
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0735710430
  • ISBN-13: 978-0735710436








Book Description

At one time, personal computer users were forced to choose among proprietary operating environments and applications. Users had no way of fixing or improving these programs, could not look “under the hood,” and were often forced to accept restrictive licenses. GNU/Linux has taken the world of computers by storm. GNU/Linux and other open source systems have changed that—now PC users, administrators, and developers can choose a free operating environment complete with tools, applications, and full source code. And many problems can be solved simply by assembling existing commands and programs using simple scripts.

The success of GNU/Linux has validated much of the UNIX philosophy. The UNIX philosophy of many small command line-oriented programs working together is the organizational principle that makes GNU/Linux so powerful. A powerful GNU/Linux application harnesses the power of these APIs and commands in its inner workings. Many of the application programming interfaces (APIs) introduced in AT&T and BSD UNIX variants survive in Linux and form the foundation on which programs are built. Even when these programs are wrapped in easy-to-use graphical user interfaces, the underlying commands are still available for power users and automated scripts. GNU/Linux’s APIs provide access to sophisticated features such as interprocess communication, multithreading, and high-performance networking.

A great deal of the success of GNU/Linux is owed to its open source nature. This opportunity has enticed thousands of capable developers worldwide to contribute new components and improvements to GNU/Linux, distributions include thousands of programs and applications spanning many CDROMs or DVDs, and to the point that modern GNU/Linux systems rival the features of any proprietary system. Because the source code for programs is publicly available, everyone can take part in development, whether by by developing and distributing a complete major application or fixing a small bug.

This book is not intended to be a comprehensive guide or reference to all aspects of GNU/Linux programming. Instead, we’ll take a tutorial approach, introducing the most important concepts and techniques, and giving examples of how to use them.

The C language is the most widely used language for developing GNU/Linux software; most of the commands and libraries that we discuss in this book, and most of the Linux kernel itself, are written in C. The information in this book is equally applicable to C++ programs because that language is roughly a superset of C. Because this is a book about advanced topics, we’ll assume that you are already familiar with the C programming language and that you know how to use the standard C library functions in your programs. Even if you program in another language, you’ll find this information useful because C language APIs and conventions are the lingua franca of GNU/Linux.

About Authors

Jeffrey Oldham received a bachelor of arts degree in computer
science from Rice University in 1991.After working at the Center for
Research on Parallel Computation, he obtained a doctor of philosophy
degree from Stanford in 2000. His research interests center on
algorithm engineering, concentrating on flow and other combinatorial
algorithms. He works on GCC and scientific computing software.

Mark Mitchell received a bachelor of arts degree in computer
science from Harvard in 1994 and a master of science degree from
Stanford in 1999. His research interests centered on computational
complexity and computer security. Mark has participated substantially
in the development of the GNU Compiler Collection, and he has a
strong interest in developing quality software.

Alex Samuel graduated from Harvard in 1995 with a degree in
physics. He worked as a software engineer at BBN before returning
to study physics at Caltech and the Stanford Linear Accelerator
Center.Alex administers the Software Carpentry project and works
on various other projects, such as optimizations in GCC.

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  • Title Ten Steps to Linux Survival: Essentials for Navigating the Bash Jungle
  • Author(s) Jim Lehmer
  • Publisher: O’Reilly Media (June, 2016)
  • Paperback 480 pages
  • eBook PDF, ePub, and Mobi (Kindle)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: N/A
  • ISBN-13: 978-1491959183








Book Description

Linux systems are everywhere today, even in companies once considered “pure Windows.” If you’re a sysadmin, network administrator, or developer in a small Windows shop, you may have to jump in and fix a system problem when your site goes down. What if you have no Linux knowledge? This short guide provides tips to help you survive.

Linux systems may appear in your shop as virtual machines or in the cloud, including web servers, databases, mobile device managers, version control, and monitoring systems. When one of them falters, this primer leads you through some diagnostic and recovery tasks so you can quickly get your site back up.

  • Connect to a Linux system with OpenSSH and PuTTY secure shells
  • List files and directories, and move around within the file system
  • Safely inspect the file contents without changing them
  • Narrow your search by using commands to locate specific files
  • Use the grep command to search for error messages inside a file
  • Determine real-time system state to find underlying problems
  • Examine disk utilization and zero in on space-hogging files
  • Transfer suspect files from Linux to Windows for later analysis
  • Use commands to start, stop, restart, or even kill unresponsive services
  • Know where to find help when troubleshooting isn’t enough

About the Authors

  • Jim Lehmer has been “in computers” for over three decades. He has held various software development roles, including programmer, systems programmer, software engineer, team lead, and software architect, and worked on a variety of operating systems with a number of programming languages. Jim currently works in a Windows shop coding primarily in C#, but with his background in cross-platform development, he often gets tapped to deal with any *IX boxes that enter the environment.

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  • Title Into the Core: A look at Tiny Core Linux
  • Author(s) Lauri Kasanen, et al
  • Publisher: Lauri Kasanen (January 3, 2010); eBook (2013)
  • Paperback N/A
  • eBook PDF (163 pages, 1.0 MB)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9529333919
  • ISBN-13: 978-9529333912








Book Description

Tiny Core Linux (TCL) is a minimal Linux operating system focusing on providing a base system using BusyBox and FLTK, developed by Robert Shingledecker. The distribution is notable for its size (15 MB) and minimalism, with additional functionality provided by extensions. Tiny Core Linux is free and open source software and is licensed under the GNU General Public License version 2.

Your Dvd player doesn’t need to print. Your thermostat doesn’t need to browse the web. The Core project is here to provide you a base to build on, one that includes nothing unnecessary. From digital signage to custom household appliances, from virtual machines to small Android install images, building it your way has never been more convenient. You have complete control over what is included, what hardware is supported, with nothing extra and no bloat. Add just what you require instead of removing what you don’t need. This book covers Core from start to finish. The concepts are explained in detail, from usage details to internals, ending up with several example projects. A stand-alone Rdp client in 17 megabytes? You got it.

This book mainly targets those with some familiarity with Linux, with no fear of the command line. A spirit of tinkering is advised, but not necessary

About the Authors

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Similar Books:

Into the Core: A look at Tiny Core Linux (Lauri Kasanen, et al)
This book covers Tiny Core Linux (TCL) from start to finish. The concepts are explained in detail, from usage details to internals, ending up with several example projects. It mainly targets those with some familiarity with Linux, with no fear of the command line.